12 Kinds of Food You Must Eat in Japan

FoodJapan
March 23, 2014 / By / Post a Comment

Japan cuisine has been loved in many places. With our one week stay in Japan specifically in Osaka, Kyoto, Tokyo, Nara and Kamakura, we were able to try some of the favorite Japanese food. 

If you have plans visiting the land of the rising sun, you can probably try some of their 12 gastronomical offerings.

  1. Gyudon

Gyudon, which literally means beef bowl, is a bowl of rice topped with beef and onions. It is one of the common lunches being served in Japan and you can find it in many fast foods. Gyudon is actually one of the affordable yet appetizing meals you can have over and over again.

You can try some variety of Gyudon like Ontama-Kimchi Gyudon which, aside from mere beef, is topped with onsen tamago or slow-cooked egg made a little spicy by taberu rayu or chili oil. A fan of spicy food, Ontama-Kimchi Gyudon is definitely my choice of Gyudon. Matsuya and Sukiya are the two famous places serving Gyudon.

  1. Yakiniku

Yakiniku is a Japanese word for grilled meat. Yakiniku restaurants have really become popular in the Philippines. It’s probably because people find it fun cooking while dining. Don’t miss it in Japan!

  1. Chicken Karaage

Chicken Karaage is one of my favorite Japanese street foods. Karaage is a Japanese cooking technique where food, usually chicken, is deeply fried in oil. You can try some on your way to Arashiyama’s Bamboo Groves.

  1. Matcha Green Tea Ice Cream

Green tea is a favorite ice cream flavor in Japan. What I like about their ice cream, even with their other desserts, is that it’s not that sweet. You will not feel guilty of eating it for a couple of scoop.

  1. Curry Rice

Curry is another popular dish in Japan. One common variety is the katsu curry (deep-fried pork cutlet).

Really famous, you can find some other versions of it like Mixed Vegetables and Egg Plant Curry. Remember to mention the spice level of your curry sauce!

  1. Tonkatsu

Tonkatsu is a breaded, deeply-fried pork cutlet usually served with shredded cabbage. Don’t forget to grind those sesame seeds and put that special Tonkatsu sauce after which combine it with your spoonful of Tonkatsu and cabbage!

  1. Okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki is Osaka’s famous traditional pancake which is sometimes called Japanese Pancake. It is usually made of wheat flour, cabbage and eggs. Okonomi means favorite and yaki means grilled. It can be found in different places in Japan, each having their own variation.

  1. Takoyaki

Takoyaki is simply made of wheat and cabbage with diced octopus. Cooked in a takoyaki pan, it is a favorite offering among food stalls in Japan.

  1. Yakisoba

Yakisoba literally means fried noodles usually mixed with meat and vegetables. Though it originally came from China, Yakisoba has become a must-try in Japanese culture.

  1. Mitarashi Dango

Mitarashi Dango is another favorite street food in Japan. It’s actually a rice dumpling skewered on sticks soaked in a combination of sweet and salty sauce.

  1. Taiyaki

Taiyaki is a Japanese fish-shaped cake. It has different fillings and we were able to try the custard one. It’s yummier when hot!

  1. Japanese Tea

Tea is an important part of Japanese culture. It is one of the favorite drinks in Japan, whether hot or cold. If you’re lucky, you can get some free taste around food stalls. You’re Japan trip will definitely not be complete without drinking one.

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ABOUT ME

Hello! I’m Arrianne and I’m from Manila, Philippines. I'm a full-time corporate junkie on weekdays and a part-time wanderer in between. Travel Habeat is my passion project, an extensive array of gastronomic adventures from different parts of the world. Enchanté!

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